Robotic system to revolutionise prostate treatment

From left, FSH Acting Executive Director Janet Zagari, FSH Head of Urology Prof Dickon Hayne, Health Minister Roger Cook, South Metropolitan Health Service Acting Chief Executive Paul Forden
From left, FSH Acting Executive Director Janet Zagari, FSH Head of Urology Prof Dickon Hayne, Health Minister Roger Cook, South Metropolitan Health Service Acting Chief Executive Paul Forden
September 13, 2017

Fiona Stanley Hospital will be the first WA public hospital to offer robotic surgery for prostate cancer, with the State Government investing $5 million in a state-of-the-art robotic system.

The da Vinci surgical system will provide urological procedures, focused on robotic-assisted prostatectomies, partial nephrectomies and radical nephrectomies.

It will also allow for 3D vision, magnification and enhanced dexterity, so surgeons are able to manipulate and dissect areas where access is challenging or limited with the human hand.

FSH Head of Urology Professor Dickon Hayne said the system was an exciting development that would have huge benefits for both patients and clinicians.

“The da Vinci system is less invasive than traditional techniques, meaning fewer complications, faster recovery times and a shorter stay in hospital,” Prof Hayne said.

“Prostatectomy currently involves up to a three-day hospital stay, which could be reduced to a 23-hour overnight stay, freeing up hospital beds and meaning more patients can have a prostatectomy sooner.

“The system also includes a training module which will be used to train the next generation of surgeons in using robotics, ensuring our patients continue to benefit from the latest technology.”

Expected to be in use by early next year, the da Vinci system will complement other leading prostate cancer services at FSH such as prostate MRI and the well-established One Stop Prostate Clinic.

Read Health Minister Roger Cook’s media statement on the da Vinci surgical system.